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A selection of new and forthcoming titles from Brill

Updated: Apr 11, 2019



Brill has recently released a number of ebooks featuring authors from Australian academic institutions and there are even more coming up on the horizon. Below we have chosen a selection from the recently published and forthcoming titles to showcase some of these authors and their work.

Recently published by Brill:


Australia's War Crimes Trials, 1945-51

By Dr Georgina Fitzpatrick, Prof. Tim McCormack (Melbourne Law School/University of Tasmania Law School) and Dr Narrelle Morris (Curtin Law School/Melbourne Law School).

Shortlisted for the Australian History Prize in the NSW Premier's History Awards 2017.

This unique volume provides a detailed analysis of Australia’s 300 war crimes trials of principally Japanese accused conducted in the immediate aftermath of the Second World War. Part I contains contextual essays explaining why Australia established military courts to conduct these trials and thematic essays considering various legal issues in, and historical perspectives on, the trials. Part II offers a comprehensive collection of eight location essays, one each for the physical locations where the trials were held. In Part III post-trial issues are reviewed, such as the operation of compounds for war criminals; the repatriation of convicted Japanese war criminals to serve the remainder of their sentences; and reflections of some of those convicted on their experience of the trials. In the final essay, a contemporary reflection on the fairness of the trials is provided, not on the basis of a twenty-first century critique of contemporary minimum standards of fair trial expected in the prosecution of war crimes, but by reviewing approaches taken in the trials themselves as well as from reactions to the trials by those associated with them. The essays are supported by a large collection of unique historical photographs, maps and statistical materials. There has been no systematic and comprehensive analysis of these trials so far, which has meant that they are virtually precluded from consideration as judicial precedent. This volume fills that gap, and offers scholars and practitioners an important and groundbreaking resource.


Syria's Monuments: Their Survival and Destruction

By Michael Greenhalgh, Australian National University

Syria's Monuments: their Survival and Destruction examines the fate of the various monuments in Syria (including present-day Lebanon, Jordan and Palestine/Israel) from Late Antiquity to the fall of the Ottoman Empire in the early 20th century. It examines travellers’ accounts, mainly from the 17th to 19th centuries, which describe religious buildings and housing in numbers and quality unknown elsewhere. The book charts the reasons why monuments lived or died, varying from earthquakes and desertification to neglect and re-use, and sets the political and social context for the Empire’s transformation toward a modern state, provoked by Western trade and example. An epilogue assesses the impact of the recent civil war on the state of the monuments, and strategies for their resurrection, with plentiful references and web links.


Religious Categories and the Construction of the Indigenous

Edited by Christopher Hartney and Daniel J. Tower, University of Sydney

This volume significantly advances the academic debate surrounding the taxonomy and the categorisation of ‘indigenous religion’. Developing approaches from leading scholars in the field, this edited volume provides the space for established and rising voices to discuss the highly problematic topic of how indigenous 'religion' can be defined and conceptualised. Constructing the Indigenous highlights the central issues in the debate between those supporting and refining current academic frameworks and those who would argue that present thinking remains too dependant on misunderstandings that arise from definitions of religion that are too inflexible, and from problems caused by the World Religion paradigm. This book will prove essential reading for those that wish to engage with contemporary discussions regarding the definitions of religion and their relations to the indigenous category.

Soon to be published by Brill:


Malay Court Religion, Culture and Language: Interpreting the Qurʾān in 17th Century Aceh

Peter G. Riddell, Melbourne School of Theology & SOAS, University of London

In Malay Court Religion, Culture and Language: Interpreting the Qurʾān in 17th Century Aceh Peter G. Riddell undertakes a detailed study of the two earliest works of Qur’anic exegesis from the Malay-Indonesian world. Riddell explores the 17th century context in the Sultanate of Aceh that produced the two works, and the history of both texts. He argues that political, social and religious factors provide important windows into the content and approaches of both Qur’anic commentaries. He also provides a transliteration of the Jawi Malay text of both commentaries on sūra 18 of the Qur'ān (al-Kahf), as well as an annotated translation into English. This work represents an important contribution to the search for greater understanding of the early Islamic history of the Malay-Indonesian world.


International Law of Sharks: Obstacles, Options and Opportunities

Erika Techera, University of Western Australia and Natalie Klein, Macquarie University

In International Law of Sharks, Erika J. Techera and Natalie Klein provide an in-depth analysis of the current legal frameworks that relate to these important species. The authors offer ways in which to overcome obstacles that prevent existing laws from working better and identify best practice global governance options while highlighting opportunities for legal reform.

Scientific evidence indicates that sharks play a critical role in maintaining marine ecosystem health, yet current governance regimes have not been effective and many shark species continue to diminish. In this context, effective laws are critical to improve sharks’ conservation status. This volume also explores the broader relevance of oceans governance by identifying appropriate legal frameworks and regulatory mechanisms that balance conservation and utilisation of marine species in general.


A Grammar of Nungon: A Papuan Language of Northeast New Guinea

Hannah S. Sarvasy (Australian National University)

A Grammar of Nungon is the most comprehensive modern reference grammar of a language of northeast Papua New Guinea. Nungon is a previously-undescribed Finisterre-Huon Papuan language spoken by about 1,000 people in the Saruwaged Mountains, Morobe Province. Hannah Sarvasy provides a rich description of the language in its cultural context, based on original immersion fieldwork. The exposition is extraordinarily thorough, covering phonetics, phonology, word classes, morphology, grammatical relations, switch-reference, valency, complex predicates, clause combining, possession, information structure, and the pragmatics of communication. Four complete interlinearized Nungon monologues and dialogues supplement the copious textual examples. A Grammar of Nungon sets a new standard of thoroughness for reference works on languages of this region.

For more information on Brill’s ebooks, or to request a quote for any selection of titles, please contact us at info@bezi.com.au

#brill #australianauthors #ebook #ebookcollection

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